Simplicity

We have learned simplicity,
we sing in the choir of cicadas

 

In 2004, the midwest of the USA became the region of the largest outbreak of biomass on the planet. Brood X emerged, the largest of the periodical cicadas, with a life cycle of 17 years.

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They spend most of their life underneath as nymphs, going through several instars, and feeding from root juices of trees. Then, almost all on the same day, they emerge, and crawl up.

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They molt into adulthood, which takes up to an hour. All this takes place above an abyss. If they fall, the soft wings will not unfold properly.

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In the last stage, the wings unfold.

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They hide and rest for a few days. This is supposedly the time they are most delicious.

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Then, they tumble around, with their poor eyesight and clumsy bodies, causing harm to none, and begin their irresistible mating chant, droning sound patterns that move through the landscape like ambient music.

17 years underneath, for a few weeks of a single song. Who will question the meaning of life?

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Time and Space

This has been an extraordinary summer. Weather wise, flooding rain falls were followed by torching heat, and now we are enjoying a dry summer weather that would be more typical for Northern Michigan. Time for a visit to the DePauw Nature Park, whose quarry enclosed space I would avoid on regular summer days. 

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It’s as green as it gets, promising a gorgeous fall coloring. Everything seems to take advantage of its given time and space.

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The abundance of vegetation creates patterns that are unusual for this place.

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More typical are the lonely little ones, like the young sycamore trying to make roots in the harsh ground,

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or the singular dandelion, gazing into our future.

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Morning Song

Most of Indiana was either woodland or prairie, before the arrival of the white man.

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Imagine endless fields filled with tall grasses where you can get lost,

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where flowers spend all night to get ready

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for the morning, and where guest from the South are welcome.

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If you come early,

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when it is very quiet,

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you might even hear a voice from far away: Some mornings are better than others.

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Fold Me!

Last year, Jiangmei Wu and I worked on some infinite polyhedra that can be folded into two different planes. Today, you get the chance to make your own (finite version of it). This is a simple craft that, time and energy permitting, will be featured at a fundraiser for the WonderLab here in Bloomington. You will need 3 (7 for the large version) sheets of card stock, scissors, a ruler and craft knife for scoring, and plenty of tape. A cup of intellectually satisfying tea will help, as always. 

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Begin by downloading the template, print the first three pages onto card stock, and cut the shapes out as above.  Lightly score the shapes along the dashed and dot-dashed line, and valley and mountain fold along them.  Note that there are lines that switch between mountain and valley folds, but all folds are easy to do.

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The letters come into play next. Tape the edges with the same letters together. Begin with the smaller yellow shape, and complete the two halves of the larger blue shapes, but keep them separate for a moment, like so:

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Stick the yellow piece into one of the blue halves, this time matching the digits. Complete the generation 2 fractal by taping the second blue half to the yellow generation 1 fractal and the other blue half.

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This object can be squeezed together in two different planes. Ideal for people who can’t keep their hands to themselves. 

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The next 2 pages of the template repeat the first three without the markings, if you’d like to build a cleaner model. You then need two printouts of page 5. The last page allows you to add on and build the generation 3 fractal. You need 4 printouts. 

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Cut, score, and fold as shown above.

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Again, tape edges together as before. There are no letters here, but the pattern is the same as before. Finally, wiggle the generation 2 fractal into the new orange frame, as you did before with the yellow piece into the blue piece.

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Here is how they now grow in our backyard. If anybody is willing to make a  generation 4 or higher versions of this, please send images.

All these polyhedra have as boundary  just a simple closed curve. Topologists will enjoy figuring out the genus.

Exposed (10 years ago)

The word Steingrund appears in the title of a post that recollects a visit to Desolation Wilderness 25 years ago. 

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Reminiscing today about a visit to Turkey Run State Park 10 years ago let’s me use another word from the same poem.

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The word exposure includes visibility, fragility and presence, and the ominously dark landscape doesn’t seem to convey this, until you notice the cracks, traces of violence that happened here many thousand years ago, unmeasurable for us.

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Patient streams have smoothed the rock and created paths that can be walked best upstream, against time.

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Trees hold on to the rocks with roots like fingers for decades, while unknown plants seem to be ready to flee any minute.

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New Harmony State Park (New Harmony IV)

We return for a last time this year to New Harmony. This time we visit the nearby state park, my original motivation to travel to the southwest corner of Indiana.

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The park is rough and unkempt, without must-see spots. Instead, you get largely untouched woodland where you have to find the subtle beauty yourself.

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May Apples play with blurred highlights as if they have been waiting for me, and somebody has left a message in the dried river bed. Unlikely, but we can dream.

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On this Friday morning a good month ago, I am the only visitor. Below once again the Wabash river, shortly before he finds oblivion in the Ohio.

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The landscape doesn’t quite feel like an Indiana landscape anymore. This is already the South. The wonderfully braided bark of the Pecan tree cannot be seen much further north.

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There is somebody else, after all. Patient Cassiopeia, waiting for the years to pass.

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The Final Chapter

I like taking pictures of people, but rarely post them. Today will I make an exception, because Jessica and Matthew are celebrating their 10th wedding anniversary, of which I had the honor and pleasure to take the pictures. Their first decade…

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Taking portraits is difficult. Heinrich von Kleist finishes his essay about the marionette theater with the dialogue:

“So we have to eat from the tree of knowledge a second time in order to achieve the state of innocence again?” – “Yes, indeed, and this will be the final chapter of the history of the world.”

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People are nor landscapes. You can treat them like that when they are unobserved to snitch the occasional good photo. Most people freeze when they become aware that somebody is taking a picture. 

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Matthew’s parents are a rare exception, the personified confidence in themselves and the world.

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Then, of course, people also don’t hold still, as do most landscapes. So one has to be vigilant and be quick.

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Happy Anniversary!

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